Recognizing the Power of Art

Wagner, David | November 10, 2016 | Leave a Comment Download as PDF

Lisa Lebofsky Petzval Glacier, 2011, oil paint on aluminum, 40x64 inches, © Lisa Lebofsky Included in Environmental Impact

Environmental Impact sequel continues to share artistic works focused on pressing environmental issues

 
A sequel to the museum exhibition, Environmental Impact has been scheduled at The North Carolina Arboretum in Ashville, in the Smoky Mountains of North Carolina from January 25 – May 10, 2020.

Additional venues are being considered to host the sequel.  Recommendations may be submitted to David J. Wagner, L.L.C., which produces the exhibition.  Suggestions should be emailed to: davidjwagnerllc@yahoo.com


Environmental Impact is a traveling museum exhibition the purpose of which is:

  • To recognize, document, and share the work of leading contemporary artists who chose to focus their work on global as well as local environmental issues; and
  • To heighten public awareness and concern about the degradation of diverse environments through the power of art.

Traditional art generally depicts nature in all of its glory, often in beautiful, pristine conditions. The 75 paintings, photographs, prints, installations, and sculptures in Environmental Impact are different than traditional works of art because they deal with ominous environmental issues and implications ranging from industrial scale resource consumption and development, to oil spills, the perils of nuclear energy, global warming, and many other phenomenon that impact and inflict people and other inhabitants which populate the planet today.

To produce Environmental Impact, Curator David Wagner draws upon a diverse range of artists whose works are not only hard-hitting, but which also propel the Environmental Movement in the modern age we live in. Work by exhibiting artists, installation photographs, media coverage and reviews, and public radio interviews may be accessed at the exhibit’s official webpage.   

Robert Bateman Carmanah Contrasts | 1989, Acrylic on Canvas, 40x45 © Robert BatemanIncluded in Environmental Impact
Robert Bateman Carmanah Contrasts | 1989, Acrylic on Canvas, 40×45
© Robert BatemanIncluded in Environmental Impact

 
About the exhibition, Michael Charles Tobias and Jane Gray Morrison of Dancing Star Foundation have written:

David Wagner’s exhibition Environmental Impact represents a new level of broad yet focused appreciation for the sheer power, promise, and impact of art on the wisdom and sensibilities of current environmental crises. And crises they are. The myriad of artists, media and subject matter encompassed in the exhibition combine to convey a remarkable testimony to the urgency, persuasiveness and abundance of insights, perspectives, and power of art. Environmental Impact is packed not with empty mantras to a better state of being for the planet and all that dwell therein, or a blind and grasping homage to the beauty of life itself, but with deeply personal statements that range from lyrical epiphanies to thoroughgoing activist expressionism; from figurative paroxysm to surreal data–crunching.

Viewers of Environmental Impact will experience the beauty, the turmoil, the levels of ambiguity and mixed message, but may also feel unexpected pangs of hope, even pragmatic responses to environmental concern and outright disaster.

Read more from Tobias and Morrison.

A review in Sculpture Review, published by The National Sculpture Society in New York, NY, by Todd Wilkinson (author of Grizzlies of Pilgrim Creek, An Intimate Portrait of 399, the Most Famous Bear of Greater Yellowstone, and, Last Stand: Ted Turner’s Quest to Save a Troubled Planet) can be found here and a report from Kent, Ohio’s WKSU Public Radio editor M.L. Schultze can be listened to below.

Canton takes a hard look at the beauty of environmental destruction | WKSU Public Radio

Some of the artists featured in Environmental Impact have graciously shared their work and words with the MAHB Community. You can find their contributions here.


A sequel to the museum exhibition, Environmental Impact has been scheduled at The North Carolina Arboretum in Ashville, in the Smoky Mountains of North Carolina from January 25 – May 10, 2020.

Additional venues are being considered to host the sequel.  Recommendations may be submitted to David J. Wagner, L.L.C., which produces the exhibition.  Suggestions should be emailed to: davidjwagnerllc@yahoo.com


This post is part of the MAHB’s Arts Community space –an open space for MAHB members to share, discuss, and connect with artwork processes and products pushing for change. Please visit the MAHB Arts Community to share and reflect on how art can promote critical changes in behavior and systems. Contact Erika with any questions or suggestions you have regarding the new space.

MAHB Blog: https://mahb.stanford.edu/creative-expressions/environmental-impact-2/

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The views and opinions expressed through the MAHB Website are those of the contributing authors and do not necessarily reflect an official position of the MAHB. The MAHB aims to share a range of perspectives and welcomes the discussions that they prompt.