From Australia to Africa, fences are stopping Earth’s great animal migration

| April 9, 2019 | Leave a Comment

Mangelsen, Abolseli Crossing. Amboseli Crossing, which captures a herd of elephants walking single file at the foot of Mt. Kilimanjaro, has won Mangelsen praise for blending the power of fine art imagery with natural history interpretation to create a mood and highlight the plight of imperiled species.

Item Link: Access the Resource

Media Type: Article - Recent

Author(s): Bill Laurance, Penny van Oosterzee

Newspaper: The Conversation

Categories: ,

For time immemorial, many wildlife species have survived by undertaking heroic long-distance migrations. But many of these great migrations are collapsing right before our eyes.

Perhaps the biggest peril to migrations is so common that we often fail to notice them: fences. Australia has the longest fences on Earth. The 5,600-kilometre “Dingo Fence” separates southeastern Australia from the rest of the country, whereas the “Rabbit-Proof Fence” stretches for almost 3,300 kilometres across Western Australia.

Both of these enormous fences were intended to repel rabbits and other “vermin” such emus, kangaroos and dingoes that were considered threats to crops or livestock. Built over a century ago, their environmental impacts were poorly understood or disregarded at the time.

Since construction these fences have caused recurring ecosystem catastrophes, such as mass die-offs of emus and other species trying to find food and water in a land notorious for the unpredictability of its rainfall, vegetation growth and fruit production.

Read the complete article here.

Email this to someoneTweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on LinkedIn
The views and opinions expressed through the MAHB Website are those of the contributing authors and do not necessarily reflect an official position of the MAHB. The MAHB aims to share a range of perspectives and welcomes the discussions that they prompt.