A Guide to Changing Someone Else’s Beliefs

| February 27, 2019 | Leave a Comment

A mind, half open

An Open Mind | Pixabay

Item Link: Access the Resource

Media Type: News / Op - Ed

Date of Publication: February 25, 2019

Author(s): Kate Morgan

Newspaper: Medium

Categories: ,

Use the science of persuasion to your advantage.

Changing minds is hard to do: When our most dearly held opinions — things like political convictions, religious beliefs, morals, and core principles — are challenged, our brains put up one hell of a fight to protect them. Research has shown that when deeply held beliefs are called into question, the amygdala, a part of the brain that processes emotions, kicks into high gear as if we were encountering danger, leaving us in no mood to consider a difference of opinion.

And yet people convincing other people to believe things is what makes the world go around. Whether you’re selling a product, angling for a promotion, or running for office, the odds are good that your job requires you to influence and persuade people in some capacity. And outside of work, many of our social relationships are built on shared beliefs: We often get along best with people who agree with us.

The same science that helps us understand how beliefs are formed can actually help us get better at changing them. The first thing you need to understand about persuasion, explains Robert Cialdini, author of Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion, is that what you’re saying matters far less than who you are.

Read the full article here. 

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