Search Results: A Plan for the Nations

What the River Knows: Nisqually River, Washington State

This article was originally published by National Geographic’s Water Currents. The original can be found here. Birthed in Mount Rainier National Park, Washington from glacier melt on the southern slope of Mount Rainier, I flow seventy-eight miles into the Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge and on into Puget Sound, a fast and galloping ride […]

Kigali Principles for Peacekeeping: Protecting civilians becoming a priority

The Kigali Principles On December 14th, the US Institute of Peace held an event with two impressive panels on Implementing the ‘Kigali Principles’ for Peacekeeping. How to Carry Out the New Best Practices for Protecting Civilians? The question mark on the end of this long but explanatory title was answered with two words.  Political Will.  Without […]

10 reasons to reconsider democracy –A non-comprehensive list

One phrase we often hear is “Don’t kill the messenger.” It is meant as a reminder that informer and information are not necessarily intimately related. In addition to asking you to keep this in mind, I also want to emphasize that the following consideration constitutes a crude oversimplification. Listing gives the impression of completeness. However, […]

Can We Save the World? Part II

This article is the second in a two-part series by Tormod V. Burkey. Part One: Can We Save the World? can be read here. In our busy and fragmented lives, things have a way of slipping. Ordinary people, politicians, organizations, international bodies, bureaucrats, we all kind of muddle along, trying to keep up with our […]

Solving Overshoot: End Overpopulation or Stop Overconsumption

The evidence is clear: the scale of the human enterprise has outgrown our planet. We need to scale back in order for the children of the world to have a chance to live decent lives. But what is it that we need to scale back? Do we need to dramatically contract our population, or drastically […]

Of Population and Pollution –A Global Warming Primer

One Man’s Thoughts on What We Need to Do to Prevent Human Extinction from Overpopulation and Global Warming In an effort to end overpopulation and solve the global warming dilemma, author Arnold J. Byron defines humanity’s severest situation in order to work backward from it—and find a solution that will revitalize our stressed planet into […]

The Ecological Aftermath of a Politically-Counterintuitive Situation

It is by no means the first time that a nation has narrowly voted to ensure that the world remain somehow inconceivably flat, ecologically speaking. History is replete with one mass delusion triggered by inner demons after another; of a variety of terrors unleashed on those who remain incredulous that there are so many stark […]

Leonardo DiCaprio’s ‘Before the Flood’: A Review

This article was originally published November 2, 2016 by Rob Hopkins with the Transition Network. The original article is available here. The release of Leonardo DiCaprio’s new film ‘Before the Flood’, near the end of a US election in which climate change has gone all but unmentioned, is to be celebrated.  As is the fact that it […]

Paris Climate Change Agreement to Enter into Force!

With  over 55 parties covering more than 55% of global greenhouse gas emissions ratifying the Paris Climate Change Agreement, the Agreement is set to enter into force November 4th! The UNFCCC issued the following statement: Over 55 Parties covering More Than 55 per cent of Global Greenhouse Gas Emissions Ratify the Paris Climate Change Agreement […]

Bioethicist: The climate crisis calls for fewer children

This post was originally published by The Conversation on September 11, 2016. The original article is available here. Earlier this summer, I found myself in the middle of a lively debate because of my work on climate change and the ethics of having children. NPR correspondent Jennifer Ludden profiled some of my work in procreative […]

Spreading the word through Eco Art

With time, change is inevitable. Our earth has undergone changes since the time of its formation through natural processes but in the most recent decades all such processes have accelerated in a completely uncontrolled way due to anthropogenic activities. This has resulted in many problems ranging from uncertainty of climate, increased disaster events, increased pollution […]

Syria: Another Pipeline War

Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. provides a detailed history of US involvement in the Middle East, how oil interests shaped those actions, and why the mass violence occurring in Syria and across the region is yet another example of a ‘pipeline war’. Among the other unassessed prices of the world’s addiction to oil are social chaos, war, […]

Unsuccessfully Seeking Solutions in the Public Sphere

We Americans are good at a lot of things, but there’s nothing we’re better at than selling a castoff truckload of broken toilets to the masses. And that skill can really get in the way of more important work we’re good at, like solving real-world problems. When it comes to environmental issues, public discourse is […]

Gender, Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, and Climate Change: What are the links?

Last month saw over 2,000 organisations from over 150 countries across the globe come together in Copenhagen at Women Deliver; the world’s largest conference on health, rights, and well-being of girls and women. Women Deliver puts girls and women at the heart of development and their message is simple, “Sustainable development is possible only when […]

Wildlife Art as a Rallying Cry in a Time of Mass Extinction

Allow me to vent a serious frustration:  For as much as they like to tout the importance of natural beauty, both the American conservation movement and many of this country’s premier fine art museums have, in recent years, been almost blind in recognizing the power of art—photography, painting and sculpture—to move the masses into action. […]

Should There Be A Right To Have As Many Kids As You Want?

Maintaining a civil society depends on a general acceptance of certain human rights and a collective (governmental) suppression of practices that interfere with those rights.  The founders of the United States of America declared that everyone has a right to “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.”  Everyone, that is, except those with the wrong […]

Revealing Nature’s Vulnerabilities As Our Own

The human relationship with nature is complex. We strive to find ways to protect ourselves from its humbling power, yet we yearn to surround ourselves with it. Nature is a respite from our technologically burdened lives – from beach oases to soaring mountaintop vistas. We enjoy its bounty of shorelines and woodlands, create havens in […]

An Expanded Realm of Desire

Over the last 20 years we have been discovering that climate science is not sufficient to properly fix global warming. The history of coal and oil shows a new paradigm: the realm of desire, a new way of thinking about human life. So, what is climate consensus in a world where the desire of the […]

Counting Down: Our addiction to oil may have an end date

There is no question that the world is addicted to oil.  We always have been (for our entire lives, at least), and always will be… Or will we? Given the unquenchable demand from billions of people the world over, oil demand is showing no signs of slowing.  The inter-connected reliance within the majority of our […]

The Unshakeable Habit of Noticing

Like a raindrop falling on the surface of the ocean, the voice of a single person has the power to effect change, rippling outward to touch and comingle with the many voices of our collective consciousness. Looking back over my life, I remember so many individuals, who through their simple words and small actions have […]

Hotspots Exclusive Interview

This interview was originally published by Her Campus on April 22, 2016, and is republished here with permission from the author and interviewee. The original interview is available here. Dr. Michael Charles Tobias is the 2016 Martha Daniel Newell Visiting Scholar at GCSU (Georgia College & State University), and President of the Dancing Star Foundation […]

Active Remedy Ltd. showcases Sacred Groves and Green Corridors for climate adaptation

Since 2003 Active Remedy Ltd. has been researching the relationship between the global water cycle, climate and mixed mountain forests. The group has looked into the extreme imbalances that are presently taking place within the global water cycle and the greatly exacerbating effects that the mass deforestation of mixed mountain forests worldwide is having upon this […]

Did Paris Address the Climate Challenges Faced by African Communities?

This article was originally published by the Wilson Center’s New Security Beat on February 29, 2016, you can find the original article here. Since its adoption after COP-21 in December 2015, the Paris Agreement has received mixed reviews. Some stakeholders, mostly industrialized countries, see the climate deal as a success. Developing countries have generally been more cautiously optimistic, […]

Getting misled by short-term thinking in U.S. presidential debates

This commentary was originally published via Environmental Health News, here. Last week the New York Times published an analysis of most-discussed topics in Republican and Democratic debates. Not surprisingly, vast gulfs exist, with Republicans talking about military power, religious liberty and the Constitution, while Democrats debated education, race and Wall Street, among others. But what […]

World Wildlife Day 2016

On 20 December 2013, at its 68th session, the United Nations General Assembly decided to proclaim 3 March, the day of signature of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), as UN World Wildlife Day to celebrate and raise awareness of the world’s wild animals and plants. The UNGA resolution also designates […]

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